Preventing Troubled Teen Suicide

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Impulsiveness is the tendency to act without thinking through a plan or its consequences. It is a symptom of a number of mental disorders, and therefore, it has been linked to suicidal behavior usually through its association with mental disorders and/or substance abuse. The mental disorders with impulsiveness most linked to suicide include borderline personality disorder among teen girls, conduct disorder among teen boys and antisocial behavior in teen boys, and alcohol and substance abuse among troubled teen boys. Impulsiveness appears to have a lesser role in older adult suicides rather than troubled teens. Impulsiveness has been linked with aggressive and violent behaviors including homicide and suicide. However, impulsiveness without aggression or violence present has also been found to contribute to risk for suicide. Many Struggling teens don’t know how to overcome the problems that they are faced with and many troubled teens need to be placed in the correct environment in order to restore themselves. Zion Educational Services can educate you on how to place troubled boys and girls in the correct environment in order to receive the help they need to overcome their struggles including, depression, suicide risk, drug abuse and much more. For immediate assistance contact ZES to speak with a child placing specialist at 866-439-8112.

Surveys of terminally ill struggling teens indicate that very few consider taking their own life, and when they do, it is in the context of depression. There is growing evidence that familial and genetic factors contribute to the risk for suicidal behavior. Major psychiatric illnesses, including bipolar disorder, major depression, schizophrenia, alcoholism and substance abuse, and certain personality disorders, which run in families, increase the risk for suicidal behavior. This does not mean that suicidal behavior is inevitable for individuals with this family history; it simply means that such persons may be more vulnerable and should take steps to reduce their risk, such as getting evaluation and treatment at the first sign of mental illness.

Although the majority of people who have depression do not die by suicide, having major depression does increase suicide risk compared to people without depression. Another way to think of suicide risk and depression is to examine the lives of people who have died by suicide and see what proportion of them were depressed. From that perspective, it is estimated that about 60% of people who commit suicide have had a mood disorder. These are the most commonly found disorders among suicidal victims, major depression, bipolar disorder, dysthymia. Other struggling teens who kill themselves often have a substance abuse disorder in addition to being depressed.

The most common risk factors for completed suicide. Alcohol and substance abuse problems contribute to suicidal behavior in several ways. Persons who are dependent on substances often have a number of other risk factors for suicide. In addition to being depressed, they are also likely to have social and financial problems. Substance use and abuse can be common among persons prone to be impulsive, and among persons who engage in many types of high risk behaviors that result in self-harm. Fortunately, there are a number of effective prevention efforts that reduce risk for substance abuse in youth, and there are effective treatments for alcohol and substance use problems.

Many parents aren’t aware the correct way to restore struggling adolescents and need a professional to educate them. For parents that need immediate assistance dealing with out of control teens, Zion Educational Services specializes in educating parents about different youth programs for troubled teens such as different types of private boarding schools, boot camps, Christian schools and many other youth facilities for both boys and girls. ZES provides you with the information to place your troubled boys and girls in the perfect treatment center that can meet their needs. If you have any questions or concerns contact ZES, (Zion Education Services) immediately to talk to a child placing specialist at 866-439-8112.

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Behavioral Health

Types: NATSAP - IECA

Wilderness Therapy

RTC (Residential Treatment Centers)

Therapeutic Boarding School

Transition
Education Consultants/Mental Health

IOPS
Intensive Outpatient Programs
Mental Health Counselor/Therapists
Kid is being worked with “at home”, local therapy. They want their client back

Focus on: (referral based)
Mental Health personnel
Educational Consultants

IOP patients

Addiction Treatment

Types: NTAAP - NAADAC - Foundations

Intervention:

Primary Care: 28 days

Extended Care: 60-90 days

Long Term Care: up to 1 year
12 step programs
Celebrate Recovery

Sober Living/IOP:

Monitoring:

Focus on:
Interventionists
programs
Mental Health facilities

Mental Health

Types: APA

911/Emergency: immediate crisis

Stabilization: up to 28 days

Psych Stay: 1-2 months

Structured Living:

Transition

Focus on:
Therapists
Guidance Counselors
Public Professionals
IOPs