Home - Boarding Schools Troubled Teens

Boarding School for Troubled Teens 

Boarding schools for the troubled teens are academic-based schools that offer intensive therapy to students who are struggling to live at home or in the general community. There are many reasons why a young person struggles to thrive in a normal setting. But when kids begin to act out, run away, or become defiant to the degree that they are a danger to themselves (no longer progressing academically) perhaps its time for an out-of-home placement in a specialized boarding school.  For immediate help locating the best boarding schools for troubled teens call and speak with our Educational Consultant. We can help you assess your child's unique needs, get a discount, or scholarship, or find a way for your insurance to help cover the cost.  Call 866-439-8112 and GET HELP NOW!

The important thing to know is that there are boarding schools specifically designed for teens who are "troubled".  "Troubled" can mean many things, but the majority of kids enrolled into boarding schools for troubled teens need extra academic help and intensive therapeutic intervention.  Simply stated, these kids really struggle to progress while living at home or in a traditional school environment.  These kids do not respond to early intervention, traditional therapy, or restrictions.  The threat of punishment does not phase them.

A boarding school for troubled teens are therapeutic-academic programs where the student lives while going to school. They live in a 24-hour supervised environment, with adult supervision 7 days per week. Moreover, they receive therapy (individual and group therapy) on a weekly bases. Parents looking at boarding schools for their troubled teenagers have decided that their child is in immediate need of an out of home placement. There are educational, emotional, and/or behavioral issues that go beyond the ability of the parent to handle.

Home - Boarding Schools Troubled Teens

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
www.troubledteensearch.com/attention-deficit-disorder-add.html
Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder occurs in 3 to 5% of teenage boys and girls. For some reason this disorder occurs more often in boys than girls. ADHD is usually diagnosed in childhood mostly due to the bright contract in attention and activity level of children. These differences are dramatically noticeable when these children are required to maintain their attention during dull, boring and repetitive tasks, and continue to reflect on them into the teenage years if not treated properly. Sometimes troubled teens with ADD or ADHD may need a professional assistance overcoming the problems that they are faced with and many struggling teens need to be placed in the correct environment in order to restore themselves.
abuse in families
www.troubledteensearch.com/abusive-family-relationships.html
Abuse in families can take many forms. It may be physical, sexual, emotional, verbal, or a combination. Neglect is also a form of abuse. In this article you will learn what abuse exactly is, why it happens, what are its effects, and what should someone who is abused do. ZES can help families find immediate solutions to ensure the safety of their teen.
Page: Prev | Next

Behavioral Health

Types: NATSAP - IECA

Wilderness Therapy

RTC (Residential Treatment Centers)

Therapeutic Boarding School

Transition
Education Consultants/Mental Health

IOPS
Intensive Outpatient Programs
Mental Health Counselor/Therapists
Kid is being worked with “at home”, local therapy. They want their client back

Focus on: (referral based)
Mental Health personnel
Educational Consultants

IOP patients

Addiction Treatment

Types: NTAAP - NAADAC - Foundations

Intervention:

Primary Care: 28 days

Extended Care: 60-90 days

Long Term Care: up to 1 year
12 step programs
Celebrate Recovery

Sober Living/IOP:

Monitoring:

Focus on:
Intervention programs
Mental Health facilities

Mental Health

Types: APA

911/Emergency: immediate crisis

Stabilization: up to 28 days

Psych Stay: 1-2 months

Structured Living:

Transition

Focus on:
Therapists
Guidance Counselors
Public Professionals
IOPs