Talking Comfortably With Your Teen About Sex

Talking Comfortably With Your Teen About Sex

Talking Comfortably With Your Teen About Sex
Talking Comfortably With Your Teen About Sex

 

Teen sex and teen pregnancy are two of the most uncomfortable topics for a parent to talk to their teen about.

While there are, undoubtedly, some parents who simply avoid the subject, other parents may go too far. As awkward as it may be, every parent needs to know the answer to the following question: How do I talk to my teen about sex

Seize the moment. 

Determining how to start the conversation is frequently one of the hardest parts when talking to your teen about dating, and sex. As a result, it is important to take advantage of situations when they present themselves. For example, if the lyrics of a certain song are sexually suggestive, use this as an opportunity to start a discussion. In today’s world, there is sexual innuendo everywhere; use it to your benefit. 

Begin your talks early. 

A child will begin asking questions, such as how a baby is born or what’s the difference between a boy and a girl, at an early age. Although you wouldn’t want to go into details, it is okay to give a simple, but honest answer. This will only make it easier to have more detailed conversations as your child becomes a teen. 

Be honest. 

Let your teen clearly know what your feelings are regarding abstinence, birth control, and other aspects of the issue. Recognize that your teen will not always see what you are trying to tell them. Listen carefully to their point of view and don’t resort to scare tactics in an effort to discourage sex; use calmness and facts. 

Give direct information. 

Make your teen aware of the risks associated with oral sex and intercourse, including STDs, unplanned pregnancy, and emotional pain. Be sure to explain that oral sex is not without risk, because this is a far too common misconception among teens. Educate your teen on birth control and provide accessible options, if necessary. Finally, encourage your teen to ask questions and clarify anything they do not understand. If you do not know the answer to a question, look for the answers together. 

Although sex education is taught in most schools, it is far from complete. It is still the parent’s responsibility to ensure that their teen is adequately informed. By being honest and offering your support, your teen can become a sexually responsible adult. 

 

 

Elevations RTC is a program that specializes in both therapy and excellent academics for teens. To find out more, call us at (855) 290-9681.

 

Related Article

Behavioral Health

Types: NATSAP - IECA

Wilderness Therapy

RTC (Residential Treatment Centers)

Therapeutic Boarding School

Transition
Education Consultants/Mental Health

IOPS
Intensive Outpatient Programs
Mental Health Counselor/Therapists
Kid is being worked with “at home”, local therapy. They want their client back

Focus on: (referral based)
Mental Health personnel
Educational Consultants

IOP patients

Addiction Treatment

Types: NTAAP - NAADAC - Foundations

Intervention:

Primary Care: 28 days

Extended Care: 60-90 days

Long Term Care: up to 1 year
12 step programs
Celebrate Recovery

Sober Living/IOP:

Monitoring:

Focus on:
Intervention programs
Mental Health facilities

Mental Health

Types: APA

911/Emergency: immediate crisis

Stabilization: up to 28 days

Psych Stay: 1-2 months

Structured Living:

Transition

Focus on:
Therapists
Guidance Counselors
Public Professionals
IOPs